Nanoparticle Dispersion

Proven Nanoparticle Dispersion Technology

High shear forces created by ultrasonic cavitation have the ability to break up particle agglomerates and result in smaller and more uniform particles sizes. The stable and homogenous suspensions produced by ultrasonics are widely used in many industries today. Probe sonication is highly effective for processing nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, inks, metal oxides, etc.) and Sonicators have become the industry standard for:

 

  • Dispersing
  • Deagglomerating
  • Particle size reduction
  • Particle synthesis and precipitation
  • Surface functionalization

Probe Sonicators Outperform Ultrasonic Cleaner Baths for Nanoparticle Dispersion

Probe sonication is significantly more powerful and effective when compared to ultrasonic cleaner baths for nanoparticle applications. A cleaner bath requires hours to accomplish what a probe Sonicator can do in minutes. Sonicators can create a stable dispersion that can remain in suspension for many months as evidenced in this article excerpt:

Dispersions in vials (a) have coagulated CNTs in the body and at the bottom by means of bath sonication for 8 hours, (b) appear free-homogenous with probe sonication for 3 minutes, and (c) keep free-homogenous even after 4 months of sitting at room temperature. The concentration of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) is 2500 mg/L and the MWCNTs/SDS ration is 1:10. (d) MWCNTs of (c) was diluted to 25 mg/L with deionized water.

It is clear that MWCNTs are not completely soluble in water by using bath Sonicator for 8 hours; there was much sedimentation of MWCNTs at the bottom of a small bottle (Fig. a). Upon operating 20 kHz applied by a probe Sonicator, the MWCNTs are entirely dispersive in aqueous solution, forming a homogeneous-free solution (Fig. b). Remarkably, there is no sedimentation observed even after four months of sitting at room temperature (Fig. c).

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